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wordt donateur van jazzmasters

Nederlands Jazz Archief

ROB PRONK - PIANIST, COMPOSER, ARRANGER & LEADER
 
--b. Malang, Nederlands-Indie, January 3th 1928 d. Munich, Germany, July 6th 2012





 

 

Rob Pronk

Robert Pronk

pictures

.Biography 

Dirigent, Componist, Arrangeur, Pianist en jazzdocent Rob Pronk (84) is vrijdagavond 6 juli in München overleden, 84 jaar oud.

4 september 2012 heeft er een Memorial voor Rob Pronk plaatsgevonden in Bodegraven.
Het was een indrukwekkend afscheid van een groot artiest. 


Joy Misa en Enno Spaanderman bedankt voor de geweldige Power Point presentatie, dank aan ook aan het Metropole Orkest en de Stichting Vrienden van het Metropole Orkest voor hun financiele bijdrage.
~ Rene Laanen
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- English- - Dutch -

Rob Pronk: Weaver Of Musical Spells

By Mike Hennessey

For a man who has written more than 1,200 arrangements for Holland's magnificent Metropole Orchestra, played trumpet in the band of Kurt Edelhagen, piano with Dexter Gordon, Don Byas, Johnny Griffin, Conte Candoli, Frank Rosolino, Zoot Sims and Ake Persson, to name just a few, and written arrangements for recordings by Rob McConnell, Pepper Adams, Hank Jones, Bill Perkins, Benny Carter, Buddy DeFranco, Toots Thielemans, Clark Terry, Lee Konitz, Lew Tabackin, Claudio Roditi, Andy Martin and dozens more, Robert "Rob" Pronk is a musician whose level of recognition falls far short of his talent and accomplishments.

A self-effacing man with a most appealing sense of humour, which manifests itself from time to time in his charts, Rob Pronk has dedicated himself to Jazz and associated music forms since he gave up studying economics in 1949 to become a professional musician.

Born in Malang, Indonesia, on January 3, 1928, Rob did not have great exposure to Jazz music in early childhood because his father, a railway engineer, was a fan of Charlie Kunz and Victor Sylvester. However, at the age of six he did hear Duke Ellington's "Mood Indigo" on the radio and was immediately hooked.

Rob's mother sang and played a little piano, and it is typical of Pronk that he says: "My mother would hold me in her arms and sing to me and I used to cry. But not because she sang out of tune."

At the age of eight he began taking piano lessons, but they only lasted for six months because the family was constantly on the move. In 1946, Rob had the good fortune to meet Jerry van Rooyen, when he brought a big band to Indonesia to entertain the troops. Says Rob, "Jerry was later to teach me the fundamentals of arranging and I owe him a great debt of gratitude."

In 1947, at the age of 19, Rob moved to Holland, studied economics at Rotterdam University and gained a bachelor's degree. At this stage in his life he was undecided as to whether to pursue a career in economics or become a professional musician. Happily for music, he finally chose the latter option and enrolled at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague where he studied trumpet, piano and theory.

Rob Pronk's first gigs, in 1949, were on a ship in an international student exchange programme. He began by playing drums, then switched to piano. His idols at that time were Duke Ellington, still an uncontested No. 1, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw and Teddy Wilson.

It was on one of these exchange trips that he spent some days in New York and visited Bop City where he heard the Buddy De Franco Sextet, which included Jimmy Raney, Kenny Drew, Teddy Kotick and Art Taylor. He also had the opportunity to enjoy performances by Louis Armstrong's All Stars and Louis Jordan's Tympany Five.

In the late 1950s, Rob joined the trumpet section of the Kurt Edelhagen Orchestra in Cologne and soon became its principal arranger. During that period he was called upon to write an arrangement of "I Didn't Know What Time It Was" for Benny Carter who was guesting with the band. Says Pronk: "Benny paid me a great compliment. He said that it sounded like a Quincy Jones arrangement. I felt like a king!"

In the 1960s, Pronk subbed for a week on trumpet in the long-established Dutch band, the Ramblers, and it was then that a colleague in the trumpet section, who was house arranger for the Metropole Orchestra, suggested that he should try writing some charts for this illustrious ensemble.

Rob took up the challenge, met it highly impressively, and, went on to contribute more than 1,200 arrangements to the Metropole library. He has derived tremendous satisfaction from his work with the Metropole Orchestra, which he regards as an aggregation which has no parallel anywhere in the world.

Says Rob: "It is a unique ensemble. It is not simply a big band with an added string section. It is a totally integrated unit and it is a tremendous challenge to write for it, but it is also a hugely fulfilling experience."

Pronk says that, aside from the invaluable help he had from Jerry van Rooyen in developing his arranging skills, he learned by trial and error. "And," he says with a smile, "there were many errors".

He cites as his principal hero in the field of arranging, the late Billy May. "For me," says Ron, "he was the arranger. The master. But I also have great admiration for Bill Holman, Al Cohn, Quincy Jones and Gil Evans."

One memory which Rob Pronk treasures above all was his being commissioned to produce and write the arrangements for a Marlene Dietrich album, "Die Neue Marlene", recorded at the EMI Studios in St John's Wood in September 1964. He conducted a 40-piece orchestra which included Kenny Baker, Harry Roche, Bobby Orr, Kenny Clare, Ivor Mairants and Larry Adler.

He also fondly recalls three sessions in Stockholm:

One in 1953 for Carousel, on which he played piano with Zoot Sims, Bob Burgess, Frank Rosolino, Ake Persson, Stan Levy and Don Bagley;

One in 1983 for the Sonet label, "In Goodmans Land", with Georgie Fame, Sylvia Vrethammar and a studio big band, and

Another for Sonet in 1988 called "String Along With Basie", for which he transcribed Basie charts for four guitars (Rune Gustafsson, George Wadenius, Bob Sylven and Bobbo Andersson) plus bass and drums.

Pronk's spell as principal arranger for the Metropole Orchestra lasted for more than 30 years, his last recording being with trombonist Andy Martin in 1998. In 1975 he was appointed guest conductor with the orchestra a post he held for 21 years. Last year, the Metropole administration decided to honour him with a tribute concert to which he was able to invite two special guests of his own choosing.

Rob recalls: "The concert was set for June 1, with my old friend John Clayton Jr. conducting the orchestra, and I planned to invite Bill Perkins and Andy Martin. But, unfortunately, Bill's doctors advised him not to do the gig because of his rapidly deteriorating physical condition. I was lucky enough to be able to get Pete Christlieb to deputise for him and he did a great job.

"Bill Perkins died in August last year and his memorial concert at the Union in Los Angeles was a must for me to attend. I had known him since 1964 and I miss him dearly. He was on my first CD with the Metropole Orchestra, "I Wished On The Moon"."

For the tribute concert last June, the Metropole Orchestra compiled a CD of 18 of the Pronk charts they had recorded between 1982 and 1992 which was presented to the 200 guests who attended the event in the Nordring Radio's largest studio.

Says Rob: "I can't tell you how honoured I was to have Pete Christlieb and Andy Martin with us on that occasion. That was a very emotional event and it took me weeks to get both my feet back on the ground."

As well as being an arranger of the utmost versatility, Pronk is immensely resourceful and has an appealingly whimsical streak to his musical nature which asserts itself from time to time. The arrangement of "I'm Just Wild About Harry", which he wrote in 1986 as a feature for the remarkable guitarist Eef Albers with the Metropole Orchestra, is a good example. It is taken at a furious pace and, in the out chorus, there are key changes every four bars in the first 24, from F to Eb to D to Bb to F and then to Eb.

In addition to his arranging activities, Rob Pronk taught arranging and composition for many years at Rotterdam Conservatory. He won the Nordring Radio Prize in 1981 and the Blaupunkt Music Award in 1988.

Johnny Mandel has said of Pronk: "He is truly a weaver of spells. Not only is he able to draw forth moods and textures from an orchestra that I have never heard before, but he also swings his butt off."

And Bill Perkins said, "I believe he ranks with the finest of our modern composer/arranger/conductors."

Says Rob: "When I look back on my 50-plus years as a professional musician, one of the abiding sources of satisfaction for me is that I had the fantastic good fortune to work with so many of the great musicians I idolised back in the 1940s and 1950s.

"One of the greatest moments in my career occurred in June 1991, when Ken Poston of the KLON radio station in Los Angeles put together an orchestra to perform a concert playing arrangements I had written for the Metropole Orchestra. I conducted the orchestra and guest soloists were Dianne Schuur, Buddy de Franco, Art Farmer, Chuck Findley, Gary Foster and Carl Fontana.

"I got the shock of my life when, during one rehearsal, a man walked up to me and introduced himself as Pete Rugulo. He asked to have a look at my charts because he wanted to see how I scored for strings.


Buddy, Rob Pronk & Artie Shaw (photo Joyce DeFranco 1991) - www.buddydefranco.com

"And another great happening for me was the presence at the concert of Artie Shaw, then 81-years-old, accompanied by Arnold Schnberg's daughter. He was planning a tour and he asked me if he could use some of my charts. Imagine that! The man I idolised as a teenager wanting to use my arrangements! And the next day, to cap it all, Artie took Buddy DeFranco and me out to dinner."

by Mike Hennessey, pianist, composer, author

John Clayton on Rob Pronk

After I moved to Holland in 1979, I heard about this arranger guy, Rob Pronk. When I first heard his music, he immediately struck me as the most soulful arranger in Europe. Not only did he know how to handle any size ensemble, he also knew how to write in every style that I could think of (that I enjoyed listening to!). He is great at writing in classical settings, big band and bebop and he can burn a hole in the score sheet with his blues! For more than 20 years, I've loved listening to his music, studying his scores and stealing his ideas! Sometimes I impress myself with my superb taste! Rob's fan forever.

credit to Jazz Now Interactive and Mike Hennessey.



Maria Schneider on Rob Pronk:

He was a wonderful man and a great great musician!

Andy Martin on Rob Pronk:

He was such a talent! And very under-appreciated as far as I know. Not enough musicians here in the USA know about him! We are a very selfish country in general. I knew when I got started as such a young person in this music business that I would see a lot of the people that I worked with were destined to pass before me... It's still so sad when I have to see it. I have seen so many pass recently (Warren Luening, Clare Fischer, Uan Rasey just to name a few).

Thanks Rob!



- English - Dutch

Bron, Haagsche Courant, 28 mei 2003 (door Bert Jansma)

De echo's van Vera Lynn hinger nog in de lucht, Nederland was aan de wederopbouw en toen was er op eens het Rob Pronk Boptet. En er was moderne jazz in Nederland. Een sprookjesbegin dat behoorlijk strookt met de werkelijkheid. Want de in het Nederlands-Indische Malang geboren Pronk (1928) had dáár al de Nieuwe Muziek gehoord, terwijl jong Nederland hier nog de oordoppen van de Duitse bezetting in had.

Het sprookje wordt nog mooier wanneer na de oorlog (1947) de Haagse, trompet-spelende broers
van Rooyen met een band naar Indonesië gaan om voor de Nederlandse strijdkrachten te spelen. Daar horen zij voor het eerst de bebop, de Jazzrevolutie van Charlie Parker, Dizzie Gillespie & Co. En ze maken op hun toernee in Bandung kennis met de jonge Rob Pronk.

Rob zou daarna naar Den Haag terugkeren om zijn studie aan het Koninklijk Conservatorium af te maken, Pronk ging ook. Hij zag 'live', -Fats Navario, J.J. Johnson, Stan Getz en het Erroll Garners trio.

Pianist en trornpettist Rob Pronk zou daarna zijn boptet vormen en vier jaar later een van eerste rnoderne Nederlandse jazzopnames maken (heruitgebracht als 'Róyal mixed - combo's in Nederland'). Het begin van een carrière die Pronk en zijn muziek over de hele wereld zou brengen. Want behalve trompettist, pianist - en bij tijd en wijlen ook zanger - zou Pronk vooral befaamd worden om zijn arrangementen voor grote orkesten.

Hij groeide er naar toe via zijn werk bij The Millers, via het Duitse orkest van Alvino Garcia, het orkest van de Nord West Deutsche Rundfunk, als arrangeur van het Kurt Edelhagen orkest, als arrangeur voor de Skymasters, de big band van Jerry van Rooyen, en voor het Metropole Orkest. Er zijn weinig orkestmusici in Europa die nooit een arrangement van Rob Pronk hebben uitgevoerd.

Zijn orkestbehandeling werd bijna een standaard van 'hoe het moest' en een Nederlandse orkestleider, pianist en arrangeur als Henk Meutgeert (Jazz Orchestra of the Concertgebouw) kan je wat dat betreft een muzikale zoon van Pronk noemen. Meutgeert: "Hij is mijn voorbeeld. Buitengewoon integer, altijd gericht op de muziek. Of hij nu een tango arrangeerde of een jazzstuk schreef, hij is altijd met grote zorgvuldigheid met muziek omgegaan. En als ik over de grenzen kijk, vind ik dat hij in het rijtje hoort van Thad jones, Quincy Jones en Gil Evans. De toparrangeurs van de wereld.'

Rob Pronk werd zondag 1 juni 2003 geféteerd, want hij was 75 jaar geworden.
In de eerste plaats door het Metropole Orkest dat hij twintig jaar lang van arrangementen voorzag en twintig jaar als gastdirigent leidde.
Zijn composities en zijn arrangementen werden gespeeld. Met een reeks internationale gasten van naam die hun muzikale respect kwamen betuigen.

Maria Schneider with Rob Pronk (Photo Lily van Oijen)
Maria Schneider with Rob Pronk
Maria Schneider with Rob Pronk (Photo Jos Knaepen)
From left to right John Clayton, Pete Christlieb, Rob Pronk and Andy Martin
(photo René Laanen)
Het complete 'Rob Pronk' Boptet omstreeks 1950 (foto Wouter van Gool,
collectie NJA. V.l.n.r.: Hans Tan (b), Jerry van Rooyen (tp), André Blok (ts),
Rob Pronk (piano), Ack van Rooyen (tp), Babes Pronk (voc), Han de Jong (drs).
Rob Pronk with Al Cohn
Rob Pronk with Clare Fischer (photo Adrian Korsner)
Rob Pronk with Bob- & Chuck Findley, Pete Candoli
Rob Pronk with Bob Florence (photo Dick Nash)
Rob Pronk with Conte Candoli
Rob Pronk with Tierney Sutton
Rob Pronk (photo Klaus Rudolph)
Rob Pronk (photo Klaus Rudolph)
Rob Pronk (photo Dick Nash)
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Doug Miles with Rob Pronk
One of the radio shows Rob did with Doug Miles in Sarasota from 2005 which aired on WSRQ radio. Here's the link:  http://blog.milestonebroadcasting.com/2012/08/22/doug-miles-interviews-jazz-legend-rob-pronk.aspx
Rob Pronk with renown vocalist Sylvia Vrethammar, Sweden
Rob Pronk with a Maria Schneider CD
Victor Kaihatu, René Laanen, Ruud & Rob Pronk, Pasar Malam Besar, The Hague, Netherlands, May, 2007 [Photo: George Dankmeyer]
Rob Pronk, Victor Kaihatu, Babs Pronk & Ruud Pronk, Pasar Malam Besar, The Hague, Netherlands, May, 2007 [Photo: George Dankmeyer]
 


 

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